The value of evidence based practice

The blind men and an elephant is a story of a group of blind men who touch an elephant to learn what it is like. Each one feels a different part, but only one part, such as the side or the tusk. They then compare notes and learn that they are in complete disagreement.

The blind men and an elephant is a story of a group of blind men who touch an elephant to learn what it is like. Each one feels a different part, but only one part, such as the side or the tusk. They then compare notes and learn that they are in complete disagreement.

The value of evidence based practice

In any field it is common that one approach gets turned into gospel, the world of massage therapy is no exception. We have strong advocates of triggerpoint therapy, myofascial release and more recently pain science, that argue tooth and nail that their approach is far superior.

I will lay it down plain and simple

The approach that judiciously uses best available evidence works best, an acute sports injuries may very well require a different approach from chronic pain issue. A tendinopathy in an athlete will require a different approach from a tendinopathy in a retired office worker. Having an overview of the best available evidence and the skill set to address each patient as an individual is the best approach.

The best approach requires a deep understanding of anatomy and physiology, this will help you 'see' what is going on inside of the living body. The best approach requires soft skills, this allows you to appropriately address concerns of each patients. The best approach requires assessment skills, this allows you to judicate between what is the most appropriate intervention for the patient at this point in time.

The best approach is evidence based massage